And then Covid Happened…

Georga
9 min readJan 14, 2023

I never wanted to take online classes. If online classes were something that appealed to me, I would have returned to college long before I did. I know me and I know online classes are not an ideal option. Kudos to anyone who can do them, but for me, it is too easy to stay in bed and sleep or forget about them all together. I was content with getting up every morning, getting out of my pajamas, lugging books across campus, getting trapped in an elevator the size of a closet, and being buried in homework.

Then Covid happened. Covid ruined everything. I have lost count of the number of times I have uttered or written that sentence. I never agreed to online classes, but that is what I was stuck with. I added a Google calendar to my computer, my tablet, and phone to accompany my planner to keep track of classes, assignments, and advising appointments. I still forget things. If I am honest, I just did not go to the last week of classes because I was stressed, exhausted, out and more worried about my stack of final papers and projects.

As the pandemic started so did the rumors across campus. We were looking to our professors for guidance. They had none to give. All they could do was what they normally do, teach. They told us what they knew. They explained what little science we had on the virus. They shared their concerns. Before the end of that first day we were told, via email, that in person classes were canceled until further notice.

Everything happened so suddenly that there was no contingency plan put in place. Half the professors disappeared and answered emails sporadically. No one was prepared to teach online, and many did not try. We were left to our own devices. Major assignments were canceled. Alternative grading options were offered to save our GPAs. Covid was doing its best to ruin education.

Ironically, less than a week before the university canceled in person classes, I managed a displaced greater tuberosity fracture of my shoulder where I broke the top part of the bone that fits into the shoulder joint. My doctor told me, “I have never seen an injury like that that didn’t require surgery.” Surgery meant putting screws into my arm to repair the break. I was expecting the worst. My university advisor was expecting me to withdraw to deal with surgery and recovery and we were getting everything in…

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Georga

University student working on their MA in English. Book reviewer, creative writer and blogger.